Bowler Hat Science

astronomy physics and dapper hats

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Black holes into darkness

Black holes into darkness

Simulation of a black hole creation event at the LHC. [ATLAS Experiment © 2014 CERN]

Simulation of a black hole creation event at the LHC. [ATLAS Experiment © 2014 CERN]

Black holes are gravity at the extreme. As such, many of their properties lie at the edge of our knowledge of physics. At the event horizon — the boundary beyond which nothing can return to the outside Universe — we must grapple with the combination of gravity and quantum physics, a problem we have yet to solve.…

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Filed under black holes firewalls Hawking radiation quantum gravity scientific mythology

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arabellesicardi:

Here is a side by side comparison of how The New York Times has profiled Michael Brown — an 18 year old black boy gunned down by police — and how they profiled Ted Bundy, one of the most prolific serial killers of all time. 

Source for Brown, Source for Bundy.

Racism is a tumor in our culture, metastasized into every organ. The NY Times likes to think of itself as above the fray, but it’s as racist as the rest of the culture.

(via itswalky)

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My favorite dark matter candidate

My favorite dark matter candidate

Roughly 85% of the mass in the Universe isn’t made of electrons, atoms, and so forth: it’s not the stuff familiar from daily life. The name we give our ignorance is dark matter, which we suspect is made of a particle of some type. We see its effects in the motion of stars and gas in galaxies, in the way galaxies cluster together, and in the relic light from the Universe’s infancy. However, the…

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Filed under axions dark matter dark matter detectors particle physics

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dailyoverview:

8/20/2014 
Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA)
Outside of Socorro County, New Mexico,
34°04′43.497″N 107°37′05.819″W
The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a radio astronomy observatory located on the Plains of San Agustin, approximately 50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro, New Mexico, USA. The observatory consists of 27 independent antennae, each of which has a dish diameter of 25 meters (82 feet) and weighs 209 metric tons. Astronomers using the VLA have made key observations of black holes and protoplanetary disks around young stars, discovered magnetic filaments and traced complex gas motions at the Milky Way’s center, probed the Universe’s cosmological parameters, and provided new knowledge about the physical mechanisms that produce radio emission.
www.overv.eu

dailyoverview:

8/20/2014 

Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA)

Outside of Socorro County, New Mexico,

34°04′43.497″N 107°37′05.819″W

The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) is a radio astronomy observatory located on the Plains of San Agustin, approximately 50 miles (80 km) west of Socorro, New Mexico, USA. The observatory consists of 27 independent antennae, each of which has a dish diameter of 25 meters (82 feet) and weighs 209 metric tons. Astronomers using the VLA have made key observations of black holes and protoplanetary disks around young stars, discovered magnetic filaments and traced complex gas motions at the Milky Way’s center, probed the Universe’s cosmological parameters, and provided new knowledge about the physical mechanisms that produce radio emission.

www.overv.eu

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A cloud in the Titanic sky

A cloud in the Titanic sky

A cloud in the sky over Titan, possibly marking the beginning of the summer storms on Saturn's biggest moon. [Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute]

A cloud in the sky over Titan, possibly marking the beginning of the summer storms on Saturn’s biggest moon. [Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute]

Titan’s seasons change slowly: each year lasts 29.5 Earth years, so each season is more than 7 Earth years long. The moon is tidally-locked, presenting the same face to Saturn all the time, just like Earth’s Moon does, and it orbits very…

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Filed under atmospheric science planetary science Titan

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In the desert (with apologies to Stephen Crane)

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his coffee in his hands,
And drank of it.
I said, “Is it good, friend?”
“It is bitter—bitter,” he answered;

“But I like it
“Because it is bitter,
“And because it is my coffee.”